Realm Blog

RealmPop: Open Source Realtime Gameplay Project

RealmPop is a simple retro multi-player game we developed for our Realm World Tour. It lets iPhone, iPad, and Android devices connect to a Realm Object Server instance and play against each other, and we’ve made it open source so you can download it and take it for a spin yourself!

We tried to find a balance between a very simple demo that would be understandable even to an audience who have never touched Realm before, and an engaging project that both keeps people excited and shows a wide range of Realm features.

Great as the event demo was (just ask all the people who volunteered to play the game live on stage) we could not add too many features to it, because we were demoing everything live (we’re only human after all :)

Hence: RealmPop 1.1!

Today we are releasing an update to RealmPop to address a few issues we discovered during the tour, and to add a more-involved server-side component where the real power of the Realm Mobile Platform lays.

The updated project shows you how to develop part of the game’s logic on the server with the help of our Node.js SDK and compliment the functionality on the mobile clients. We’ve sprinkled comments all around the code too, you’re welcome :)

schema

We’ve updated RealmPop’s README with detailed instructions on how to:

  • install & run Realm Mobile Platform
  • configure & run the RealmPop server app
  • and run the iOS and Android games

So what are you waiting for? Head to the repo https://github.com/realm/RealmPop right now, follow the README and have the RealmPop server and mobile apps running in no time!

PS: What would you like to see next in RealmPop? Server bots? React Native? More advanced multiplayer features? Let us know on twitter and tag with #realmpop.


Marin Todorov

Marin Todorov is an independent iOS consultant and publisher. He’s co-author on the book “RxSwift: Reactive programming with Swift” the author of “iOS Animations by Tutorials”. He’s part of Realm and raywenderlich.com. Besides crafting code, Marin also enjoys blogging, writing books, teaching, and speaking. He sometimes open sources his code. He walked the way to Santiago.